Kon テ ン ツ に ス キ ッ プ
uncle editor
Aug 3, 2023

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~05

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~05

uncle editor

Aug 03, 2023

Yanagihara's culture, who calls himself a "Funekichi"

Yanagihara's culture, who calls himself a "Funekichi"

What does it mean to know everything about ships?

What does it mean to know everything about ships?

Now, let's finally talk about ships. Yanagihara's love for ships (=knowledge) is so vast and deep that it's hard to know where to start. Anyone who reads books such as ``Picture Diary of a Boat Trip'' (Tokuma Bunko) will realize this concentration.

In addition to specifications such as displacement (gross tonnage), speed, number of passengers, ship's flag, construction company, and ownership company (as well as changes), there is also a diagram showing the location of each cabin, as well as cabin fees from first to third class. Described in detail. Of course, some may say that you can understand this by researching or taking notes. However, at that time, it was impossible to easily search and find out information. You have no choice but to find out the investigation methods and contact information on your own.

However, even so, I went out on deck late at night on what month and day, and I still don't know about the geography and course of the ship I am currently sailing ●● off the coast of ●●, and the names of the ships I pass or pass while sailing. When you arrive at the port, everything is covered, right down to the names of the large and small ships moored. I can only assume that he already had it in his head, not to mention his powers of observation.

Now, let's finally talk about ships. Yanagihara's love for ships (=knowledge) is so vast and deep that it's hard to know where to start. Anyone who reads books such as ``Picture Diary of a Boat Trip'' (Tokuma Bunko) will realize this concentration.

In addition to specifications such as displacement (gross tonnage), speed, number of passengers, ship's flag, construction company, and ownership company (as well as changes), there is also a diagram showing the location of each cabin, as well as cabin fees from first to third class. Described in detail. Of course, some may say that you can understand this by researching or taking notes. However, at that time, it was impossible to easily search and find out information. You have no choice but to find out the investigation methods and contact information on your own.

However, even so, I went out on deck late at night on what month and day, and I still don't know about the geography and course of the ship I am currently sailing ●● off the coast of ●●, and the names of the ships I pass or pass while sailing. When you arrive at the port, everything is covered, right down to the names of the large and small ships moored. I can only assume that he already had it in his head, not to mention his powers of observation.

Did such a Japanese person exist?

It also lists the nationalities of the captain, chef, and crew of the ship (even if they are different), the ratio of passengers by country, and the variety and taste of the menu (of course, it clearly states that if something is bad, it is bad). , and the interactions with those people (who are extremely smart) are also described in detail. What's more, they are kindly designed, sometimes with a portrait included. And no matter what, I don't like the obvious prejudices such as "I'm Italian but I don't talk" or "Because I'm German".

I wrote "prejudice," but I must say this for Yanagihara's honor. His actions on the cruise show no prejudice whatsoever, regardless of nationality or race. The description ``Even though I'm Italian'' is his first-rate humor, written on the premise that stereotypical preconceptions have become common knowledge.

It is also surprising that at a time when Japanese people did not use words such as ``global,'' which sounded nice but were not ambiguous, there were Japanese people who were completely immersed in a time and space that could be called truly global. was. Just like a celebrity (at a time when the word "celebrity" didn't even exist). I admire this.

Mr. Okabe, who appeared last time, also talked about his impressions when he met Yanagihara.

"I admired him, but I felt like he was a person from another dimension that was difficult to match. I would never be able to enter that world. Now that I've studied, I feel like I can finally enter a little bit. I feel like I'm a person above the clouds. .However, when I was introduced to him, he was smiling and friendly."

Yanagihara's secret weapon

Did such a Japanese person exist?

The most powerful secret weapon that Yanagihara brought onto the ship. It's a sketchbook. Yanagihara was showing off his sketches all over the place, leaning on deck chairs lined up by the poolside of a luxury cruise ship, on the deck with a pleasant breeze blowing through, and even drinking a glass of whiskey at the bar counter after dinner. He wasn't trying to show it off, he was just drawing it. However, when he sees a man like that (and a picture of that quality), he becomes interested no matter what country he is from.

Yanagihara would probably have become a famous man on the ship a few days after leaving port. When the passengers return to their respective countries after the voyage and look back on their memories, Yanagihara's image during the sketch may have come to mind as one of the scenes. That Asian man with glasses was no ordinary person.

What is strange, however, is why Yanagihara, who was not a returnee, had difficulty communicating with foreigners. In her books, there are passages in which she vents (humbly) about her own poor English skills. However, her language skills probably didn't have much of an impact. He must have had some sort of communication ability that allowed him to communicate. His son Ryota Yanagihara says:

``I think that was true. I never heard anything about English from my father, but I can draw pictures. I can quickly draw anything. When I start drawing, everyone gathers around and it becomes a hot topic. I wonder if something like that happened."

It also lists the nationalities of the captain, chef, and crew of the ship (even if they are different), the ratio of passengers by country, and the variety and taste of the menu (of course, it clearly states that if something is bad, it is bad). , and the interactions with those people (who are extremely smart) are also described in detail. What's more, they are kindly designed, sometimes with a portrait included. And no matter what, I don't like the obvious prejudices such as "I'm Italian but I don't talk" or "Because I'm German".

I wrote "prejudice," but I must say this for Yanagihara's honor. His actions on the cruise show no prejudice whatsoever, regardless of nationality or race. The description ``Even though I'm Italian'' is his first-rate humor, written on the premise that stereotypical preconceptions have become common knowledge.

It is also surprising that at a time when Japanese people did not use words such as ``global,'' which sounded nice but were not ambiguous, there were Japanese people who were completely immersed in a time and space that could be called truly global. was. Just like a celebrity (at a time when the word "celebrity" didn't even exist). I admire this.

Mr. Okabe, who appeared last time, also talked about his impressions when he met Yanagihara.

"I admired him, but I felt like he was a person from another dimension that was difficult to match. I would never be able to enter that world. Now that I've studied, I feel like I can finally enter a little bit. I feel like I'm a person above the clouds. .However, when I was introduced to him, he was smiling and friendly."

Yanagihara's secret weapon

What is modern pentathlon on a cruise?

The most powerful secret weapon that Yanagihara brought onto the ship. It's a sketchbook. Yanagihara was showing off his sketches all over the place, leaning on deck chairs lined up by the poolside of a luxury cruise ship, on the deck with a pleasant breeze blowing through, and even drinking a glass of whiskey at the bar counter after dinner. He wasn't trying to show it off, he was just drawing it. However, when he sees a man like that (and a picture of that quality), he becomes interested no matter what country he is from.

Yanagihara would probably have become a famous man on the ship a few days after leaving port. When the passengers return to their respective countries after the voyage and look back on their memories, Yanagihara's image during the sketch may have come to mind as one of the scenes. That Asian man with glasses was no ordinary person.

What is strange, however, is why Yanagihara, who was not a returnee, had difficulty communicating with foreigners. In her books, there are passages in which she vents (humbly) about her own poor English skills. However, her language skills probably didn't have much of an impact. He must have had some sort of communication ability that allowed him to communicate.

His son Ryota Yanagihara says: ``I think that was true. I never heard anything about English from my father, but I can draw pictures. I can quickly draw anything. When I start drawing, everyone gathers around and it becomes a hot topic. I wonder if something like that happened."

What is modern pentathlon on a cruise?

Yanagihara, who lives on a ship, learns that ``Pitore'', which he thought was a person's name at first, means ``painter'' in Italian, balks at dancing with a blonde woman, and learns that he won at a casino. I keep losing, losing, losing (lol). This experience is further sublimated and accumulated into knowledge.

According to the ``Picture Diary of a Cruise'', the modern five types of cruises are dancing, ping pong, playing cards, gambling, and drinking. Once you can enjoy these things, the appeal of a cruise will become even more appealing. why.

This is because modern pentathlon on a ship requires a partner for everything except alcohol. On long cruises, table tennis tournaments include not only singles but also doubles. Of course, I don't know who my doubles partner will be. When it comes to dancing, I don't know which madam I'll be paired with. Even if you can make sake by yourself, it will be more exciting if you have someone with you.

In Yanagihara's case, he was good at drinking, but apparently was not good at dancing, and he had a heartwarming conversation with a young Japanese man he met on the ship, saying, ``I have to learn how to dance before next time.'' It is reassuring to know that even though Yanagihara had the appearance of an imposing celebrity, he also had the sensibilities of an ordinary civilian (?).

However, when I read this, I realized that even today's Japanese people would find it extremely difficult to win a medal in this ``modern pentathlon.'' ``Let's throw away our complexes for just this cruise!'' a voice that sounds just like Shohei Otani echoes hollowly in his heart.

When we started talking about ships, we ended up talking about voyages. Well, Yanagihara, who was a ``funeral person'', was also a ``boater lover'' after all. (Next issue below)

Yanagihara, who lives on a ship, learns that ``Pitore'', which he thought was a person's name at first, means ``painter'' in Italian, balks at dancing with a blonde woman, and learns that he won at a casino. I keep losing, losing, losing (lol). This experience is further sublimated and accumulated into knowledge.

According to the ``Picture Diary of a Cruise'', the modern five types of cruises are dancing, ping pong, playing cards, gambling, and drinking. Once you can enjoy these things, the appeal of a cruise will become even more appealing. why.

This is because modern pentathlon on a ship requires a partner for everything except alcohol. On long cruises, table tennis tournaments include not only singles but also doubles. Of course, I don't know who my doubles partner will be. When it comes to dancing, I don't know which madam I'll be paired with. Even if you can make sake by yourself, it will be more exciting if you have someone with you.

In Yanagihara's case, he was good at drinking, but apparently was not good at dancing, and he had a heartwarming conversation with a young Japanese man he met on the ship, saying, ``I have to learn how to dance before next time.'' It is reassuring to know that even though Yanagihara had the appearance of an imposing celebrity, he also had the sensibilities of an ordinary civilian (?).

However, when I read this, I realized that even today's Japanese people would find it extremely difficult to win a medal in this ``modern pentathlon.'' ``Let's throw away our complexes for just this cruise!'' a voice that sounds just like Shohei Otani echoes hollowly in his heart.

When we started talking about ships, we ended up talking about voyages. Well, Yanagihara, who was a ``funeral person'', was also a ``boater lover'' after all. (Next issue below)

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

Ryohei Yanagihara

Born in Tokyo in 1931. In 1954, he joined Kotobukiya (now Suntory Holdings). He produced many popular advertisements one after another and won many awards, including the Dentsu Award and the Mainichi Industrial Design Award, before retiring and going independent. He loved ships and ports and moved to Yokohama. In addition to being a painter, he is a graphic designer, book designer, picture book author, animator, and writer. Passed away on August 2015, 8 at the age of 17.

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

References
・"Picture Diary of a Boat Trip" (Tokuma Bunko)

People who cooperated
● Ryota Yanagihara (Ryota Yanagihara) Born in April 1961 in Tokyo, the eldest son of father Ryohei and mother Kaoru. When he was 4 years old he moved to Yokohama and spent his childhood in Yokohama. In 3, he joined the Bank of Japan. He retired from the Bank of Japan in 1985 and is currently working at a logistics company. He lives in Tokyo.


●Masayuki Okabe Born in 1957 in Yokohama. Since he was a boy, he has been interested in the art, port and ship culture, and history of his hometown, Yokohama. In 1984, he worked as a curator in the preparation room of the Yokohama City Museum of Art, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara through a regional culture salon. In 1992, he became a full-time lecturer (art history) at the Department of History, Faculty of Letters, Teikyo University. Currently professor emeritus of the Faculty of Letters at Teikyo University and special director of the Gunma Museum of Modern Art. )

Those who cooperated

● Ryota Yanagihara (Ryota Yanagihara) Born in April 1961 in Tokyo, the eldest son of father Ryohei and mother Kaoru. When he was 4 years old he moved to Yokohama and spent his childhood in Yokohama. In 3, he joined the Bank of Japan. He retired from the Bank of Japan in 1985 and is currently working at a logistics company. He lives in Tokyo. 

●Masayuki Okabe Born in 1957 in Yokohama. Since he was a boy, he has been interested in the art, port and ship culture, and history of his hometown, Yokohama. In 1984, he worked as a curator in the preparation room of the Yokohama City Museum of Art, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara through a regional culture salon. In 1992, he became a full-time lecturer (art history) at the Department of History, Faculty of Letters, Teikyo University. Currently professor emeritus of the Faculty of Letters at Teikyo University and special director of the Gunma Museum of Modern Art.                      

References
・"Picture Diary of a Boat Trip" (Tokuma Bunko)

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .