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uncle editor
July 20, 2023

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~03

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~03

uncle editor

July 20, 2023

Universality called charm

Universality called charm

What is the universality in ship paintings?

What is the universality in ship paintings?

Last time, I wrote about the birth of Uncle Tris, an immortal character who is still very active even today, more than half a century after his birth in 1958. Even Ryohei Yanagihara himself never imagined that he would be active for such a long time.

This can be said to be proof that there is a universality within the work that even the author himself was unaware of. In other words, Ryohei Yanagihara's works possess a ``universality known as charm.''

In fact, the story won't proceed unless we assume that. For this reason, this time we will examine the ``paintings of ships,'' which occupy an overwhelming proportion of Yanagihara's works, on the assumption that they have a similar universality.

Last time, I wrote about the birth of Uncle Tris, an immortal character who is still very active even today, more than half a century after his birth in 1958. Even Ryohei Yanagihara himself never imagined that he would be active for such a long time.

This can be said to be proof that there is a universality within the work that even the author himself was unaware of. In other words, Ryohei Yanagihara's works possess a ``universality known as charm.''

In fact, the story won't proceed unless we assume that. For this reason, this time we will examine the ``paintings of ships,'' which occupy an overwhelming proportion of Yanagihara's works, on the assumption that they have a similar universality.

For example, in this work

I hope you can read this while looking at the main visual. This is a scene from a picture book called ``What Should I Do About My Death?'' (Fukuinkan Shoten). A collision between ships occurs, and the scenes of various ships heading to the rescue are ``vividly'' depicted (I know this is an inappropriate expression considering the story is about an accident).

On the far right of the picture are a large black ship and a small cargo ship that collided. The hydrofoil depicted in the center is rushing to the scene with hydrofoils attached to both sides exposed. Below, on the left, a child who was thrown into the sea due to an accident, and an adult on a boat reaching out to rescue him, and a rescue boat rushes in from the left.

While looking at each ship

For example, in this work

However, what I want to say here is, for example, how can a small ship colliding with a large ship be known to be a cargo ship? That's what it means. That's because it has a crane on board, and you can see (part of) a box-shaped cargo with ropes attached to it.

Both the hydrofoil boat in the center and the rescue boat on the lower right have red lights, so you can tell that they are police boats.

The wooden boat on the lower left is called a barge, and it is a small boat that carries small cargo that can be carried and unloaded by laborers in the harbor or bay. They are responsible for transporting small cargo packed in wooden boxes and cardboard from warehouses in the port to the wharf where large cargo ships are anchored.

In other words, the owner of this barge happened to find a child who had fallen into the sea, and was trying to save him? And when my imagination goes that far, I think, ``Good luck, barge guy!'' It's a problem because it makes me want to support them (actually, I don't have any problems at all).

And the fact that the hull of the hydrofoil has been raised so much that most of its "hydrofoils" are exposed means that it must be traveling at a considerable speed.You can see that the rescue boat in the lower right is running through the wind to rescue the child. There are horizontal lines drawn in white pen (the main text of the picture book says that this ship is a ``jet-propelled rescue boat''), and I can feel a sense of excitement slowly spreading over it, thinking it's reliable.

I hope you can read this while looking at the main visual. This is a scene from a picture book called ``What Should I Do About My Death?'' (Fukuinkan Shoten). A collision between ships occurs, and the scenes of various ships heading to the rescue are ``vividly'' depicted (I know this is an inappropriate expression considering the story is about an accident).

On the far right of the picture are a large black ship and a small cargo ship that collided. The hydrofoil depicted in the center is rushing to the scene with hydrofoils attached to both sides exposed. Below, on the left, a child who was thrown into the sea due to an accident, and an adult on a boat reaching out to rescue him, and a rescue boat rushes in from the left.

While looking at each ship

older adults than children

However, what I want to say here is, for example, how can a small ship colliding with a large ship be known to be a cargo ship? That's what it means. That's because it has a crane on board, and you can see (part of) a box-shaped cargo with ropes attached to it.

Both the hydrofoil boat in the center and the rescue boat on the lower right have red lights, so you can tell that they are police boats.

The wooden boat on the lower left is called a barge, and it is a small boat that carries small cargo that can be carried and unloaded by laborers in the harbor or bay. They are responsible for transporting small cargo packed in wooden boxes and cardboard from warehouses in the port to the wharf where large cargo ships are anchored.

In other words, the owner of this barge happened to find a child who had fallen into the sea, and was trying to save him? And when my imagination goes that far, I think, ``Good luck, barge guy!'' It's a problem because it makes me want to support them (actually, I don't have any problems at all).

And the fact that the hull of the hydrofoil has been raised so much that most of its "hydrofoils" are exposed means that it must be traveling at a considerable speed.You can see that the rescue boat in the lower right is running through the wind to rescue the child. There are horizontal lines drawn in white pen (the main text of the picture book says that this ship is a ``jet-propelled rescue boat''), and I can feel a sense of excitement slowly spreading over it, thinking it's reliable.

older adults than children

When you look at it quickly, you don't notice it, but as you look at it, you start noticing things. If you look into it, you'll see that he drew it based on the real thing, such as the shape of the crane installed on the cargo ship and the location of the red lights on the police ship. It is then that we finally realize that this picture is of a quality that even adults can appreciate, and that it is not a so-called ``child deception'' picture.

In fact, only knowledgeable adults can understand that this is a work that can be perceived as real. This is because you can see not only the type of each ship, but also which ship is here (depicted) for what purpose in this situation (collision).

Of course, nowadays, large cargoes are handled in containers and cargo is handled using gantry cranes installed at ports, so there is no need for small cargo ships. However, these cargo ships, which can handle cargo on their own, are very useful in ports without crane facilities, and barges are indispensable in rivers and canals where the water is too shallow for cargo ships to pass. . This work is a frame from a picture book published in 1964, but even when you look at it now, it doesn't feel old; it's timeless.

It's entirely possible that one day, a parent might buy this picture book for their child, read it, and end up being more into it. Maybe a coast guard bought it for the purpose of teaching his children what he does. ``My dad (or mom) is on this boat,'' he said.

Conclusion. What is the true nature of universality?

I plan to write about color sense, the touch of the work, deformation, various techniques, etc. in another time, but what I would like to say this time is that Yanagihara's work transcends time and has a hook that appeals to all age groups, from infants to adults. It is a work that has a certain charm. In other words, this may be the true meaning of "universality" that I wrote about at the beginning.

It's the same as Southern and Yumin's songs being accepted by men and women of all ages throughout the ages. That's why I never tire of looking at the ships drawn by Ryohei Yanagihara. (Next issue below)

When you look at it quickly, you don't notice it, but as you look at it, you start noticing things. If you look into it, you'll see that he drew it based on the real thing, such as the shape of the crane installed on the cargo ship and the location of the red lights on the police ship. It is then that we finally realize that this picture is of a quality that even adults can appreciate, and that it is not a so-called ``child deception'' picture.

In fact, only knowledgeable adults can understand that this is a work that can be perceived as real. This is because you can see not only the type of each ship, but also which ship is here (depicted) for what purpose in this situation (collision).

Of course, nowadays, large cargoes are handled in containers and cargo is handled using gantry cranes installed at ports, so there is no need for small cargo ships. However, these cargo ships, which can handle cargo on their own, are very useful in ports without crane facilities, and barges are indispensable in rivers and canals where the water is too shallow for cargo ships to pass. . This work is a frame from a picture book published in 1964, but even when you look at it now, it doesn't feel old; it's timeless.

It's entirely possible that one day, a parent might buy this picture book for their child, read it, and end up being more into it. Maybe a coast guard bought it for the purpose of teaching his children what he does. ``My dad (or mom) is on this boat,'' he said.

Conclusion. What is the true nature of universality?

I plan to write about color sense, the touch of the work, deformation, various techniques, etc. in another time, but what I would like to say this time is that Yanagihara's work transcends time and has a hook that appeals to all age groups, from infants to adults. It is a work that has a certain charm. In other words, this may be the true meaning of "universality" that I wrote about at the beginning.

It's the same as Southern and Yumin's songs being accepted by men and women of all ages throughout the ages. That's why I never tire of looking at the ships drawn by Ryohei Yanagihara. (Next issue below)

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

References
・“Shoboutei Shutsu Dosei” (Fukuinkan Shoten)

References
・“Shoboutei Shutsu Dosei” (Fukuinkan Shoten)

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .