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uncle editor
July 13, 2023

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~02

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~02

uncle editor

July 13, 2023

Originality in portrait painting

Originality in portrait painting

carve your own path

carve your own path

Ships and ports are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has dealt with throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .

Many of Yanagihara's portraits are manga-like. He was also active as a manga artist for a time, so it's only natural. The path to developing his unique style began with his joining Kotobukiya (currently Suntory Holdings).

At Yanagihara's part-time job, there was an art director he admired, Takao Yamazaki. When Yanagihara learns that Yamazaki has been headhunted by Kotobuki, he makes up his mind and asks, ``Please take me with you.'' This was the impetus for joining Kotobukiya.

Ships and ports are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has dealt with throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .

Many of Yanagihara's portraits are manga-like. He was also active as a manga artist for a time, so it's only natural. The path to developing his unique style began with his joining Kotobukiya (currently Suntory Holdings).

At Yanagihara's part-time job, there was an art director he admired, Takao Yamazaki. When Yanagihara learns that Yamazaki has been headhunted by Kotobuki, he makes up his mind and asks, ``Please take me with you.'' This was the impetus for joining Kotobukiya.

luck is out of skill

The actions of Yamazaki, who recognized the talent of Yanagihara, who was just a young man working part-time as an illustrator, and asked Kotobukiya to do the same for him were also reliable, but Keizo Saji (later the president of Kotobukiya) accepted the request with the words, ``Kamashimahende!'' I also had deep feelings for him. However, even with such good luck, Ryohei Yanagihara's decision to ask someone to take him with him, in other words, to carve out his own path, was nothing short of a blessing in disguise. Luck is also a part of ability.

By the way, ``luck is part of ability'' does not refer to a situation where luck makes up for a lack of ability. It's fine if the person himself says it out of humility, but it's wrong for others to use it that way. Instead, I personally think it makes more sense to think that the premise is that you have the potential and actual ability to attract even luck. I think this is even more true when I learn about Yanagihara's rapid progress since then.

A bunch of talent coming together one after another

luck is out of skill

Yanagihara joins Kotobukiya and meets Ken Kaiko (later an Akutagawa Prize-winning author). Kotobukiya, who was headhunting the talented art director Takao Yamazaki, focused on advertising, and placed Kaiko and Yanagihara at the center of their creative efforts, giving them a certain degree of freedom, albeit strict. As a result, it quickly became a big hit in the community, and the company's image greatly improved as a result of Shinjiro Torii's (founder of Kotobukiya) ``Yatte Minahare'' spirit.

Kaiko was in charge of the copy, Yanagihara was in charge of the illustrations, and with the addition of Susumu Sakane, an experienced designer and producer, the trio was the strongest. The stylish and lively advertisements, which reflected the times, created a stir in the advertising industry and won various advertising awards.

They continued to prove that the multiplicative power of top-class craftsmen is invincible. Later, Hitomi Yamaguchi (who later won the Naoki Prize and the Kikuchi Kan Prize) joined the group. It continued to receive high praise, winning the Asahi Advertising Encouragement Award and ADC Award in 1958, and the Dentsu Television Advertising Award in 1959, so I guess it was no longer ``invincible'' but more like ``I can't make boring things.'' It is assumed that there is no such thing.

Not satisfied with just newspaper advertisements, this creative group even created a PR magazine called ``Western Liquor Heaven'' for the Toris Whiskey chain. Thanks to their clever copy that quickly sums up the era, their fun and urbane illustrations and papercuts, and their sophisticated art direction, these advertisements gained overwhelming support from the public.

The actions of Yamazaki, who recognized the talent of Yanagihara, who was just a young man working part-time as an illustrator, and asked Kotobukiya to do the same for him were also reliable, but Keizo Saji (later the president of Kotobukiya) accepted the request with the words, ``Kamashimahende!'' I also had deep feelings for him. However, even with such good luck, Ryohei Yanagihara's decision to ask someone to take him with him, in other words, to carve out his own path, was nothing short of a blessing in disguise. Luck is also a part of ability.

By the way, ``luck is part of ability'' does not refer to a situation where luck makes up for a lack of ability. It's fine if the person himself says it out of humility, but it's wrong for others to use it that way. Instead, I personally think it makes more sense to think that the premise is that you have the potential and actual ability to attract even luck. I think this is even more true when I learn about Yanagihara's rapid progress since then.

A bunch of talent coming together one after another

Stylish illustrations that amplify your admiration

Yanagihara joins Kotobukiya and meets Ken Kaiko (later an Akutagawa Prize-winning author). Kotobukiya, who was headhunting the talented art director Takao Yamazaki, focused on advertising, and placed Kaiko and Yanagihara at the center of their creative efforts, giving them a certain degree of freedom, albeit strict. As a result, it quickly became a big hit in the community, and the company's image greatly improved as a result of Shinjiro Torii's (founder of Kotobukiya) ``Yatte Minahare'' spirit.

Kaiko was in charge of the copy, Yanagihara was in charge of the illustrations, and with the addition of Susumu Sakane, an experienced designer and producer, the trio was the strongest. The stylish and lively advertisements, which reflected the times, created a stir in the advertising industry and won various advertising awards.

They continued to prove that the multiplicative power of top-class craftsmen is invincible. Later, Hitomi Yamaguchi (who later won the Naoki Prize and the Kikuchi Kan Prize) joined the group. It continued to receive high praise, winning the Asahi Advertising Encouragement Award and ADC Award in 1958, and the Dentsu Television Advertising Award in 1959, so I guess it was no longer ``invincible'' but more like ``I can't make boring things.'' It is assumed that there is no such thing.

Not satisfied with just newspaper advertisements, this creative group even created a PR magazine called ``Western Liquor Heaven'' for the Toris Whiskey chain. Thanks to their clever copy that quickly sums up the era, their fun and urbane illustrations and papercuts, and their sophisticated art direction, these advertisements gained overwhelming support from the public.

Stylish illustrations that amplify your admiration

At this point, the portraits appearing in newspaper advertisements included a stylish woman with eight heads (to promote Akadama Port Wine) and a young businessman with long legs (to promote Toris Whiskey), all happily having a drink. Although it has a cartoonish feel to it, it doesn't have a purely fashionable and comical atmosphere.

"Western Liquor Heaven" features characters from various races around the world, including Yanagihara's depiction of Bacchus, the god of wine, and the aspirations of the masses living in the period of post-war reconstruction and growth, when there was a strong cultural tendency to follow the West. greatly aroused the Overall, it was the most sophisticated visuals that were at the cutting edge of the times. Kotobukiya's sake must have sold very well. Thank you very much for your help.

Is Uncle Triss a symbol of functional beauty?

The immortal character ``Uncle Triss'' was born in such an era as Mitsuru's attendant. Kotobukiya noticed that black-and-white televisions were starting to become popular, and decided to enter into television commercials. In line with this, Ryohei Yanagihara, Ken Kaiko, and Mutsuo Sakai, an art university graduate who will become Yanagihara's junior, immediately begin a meeting. And, lo and behold, 3 minutes later, Uncle Tris was already born.

The reason for the super cheap delivery. That's because the concept was excellent. The concept, which was conceived with the premise of appearing on television, was summarized into the following three points.

(1) Make your facial expressions visible
(2) Make your (expressive) face stand out
(3) Even if it appears frequently, there should be no sarcasm

In order to convey expression, the eyes of the characters had previously been drawn with simple black dots, but by drawing ``black eyes inside round eyelids,'' he gave the eyes more nuance. In order to make her face stand out, I boldly created a ``two-and-a-half head'' proportion. Also, in order to avoid making him feel unpleasant even when commercials are frequently shown on TV (even when he is shown drinking scenes over and over again), he was made to be an ``elderly gentleman'' instead of a young man.

Did Uncle Tris make Yanagihara a manga artist?

Although he was a functionally created character, this middle-aged man with round eyelids and a 2-2-XNUMX/XNUMX-inch body was soon used for other characters, and became the standard specification for portraits appearing in Yanagihara manga.

If you look at Asahi Shimbun's 5-panel comic "Picaro Grandpa" (1959-), Yomiuri Shimbun's Evening Edition's "Today is a Day" (1963-), Komei Shimbun's "Ryo-chan" (1980-), etc. It's obvious at a glance. The story of the fairy tale ``The Three Police Officers'' was similar.

However, the fact that it only took 30 minutes to create this character is nothing short of miraculous. Perhaps Bacchus, the god of wine, appeared in the conference room and smiled. This is because there was probably a whiskey bottle sitting next to the three people that would be convenient for Bacchus to hide in (for filming). (Next issue below)

At this point, the portraits appearing in newspaper advertisements included a stylish woman with eight heads (to promote Akadama Port Wine) and a young businessman with long legs (to promote Toris Whiskey), all happily having a drink. Although it has a cartoonish feel to it, it doesn't have a purely fashionable and comical atmosphere.

"Western Liquor Heaven" features characters from various races around the world, including Yanagihara's depiction of Bacchus, the god of wine, and the aspirations of the masses living in the period of post-war reconstruction and growth, when there was a strong cultural tendency to follow the West. greatly aroused the Overall, it was the most sophisticated visuals that were at the cutting edge of the times. Kotobukiya's sake must have sold very well. Thank you very much for your help.

Is Uncle Triss a symbol of functional beauty?

The immortal character ``Uncle Triss'' was born in such an era as Mitsuru's attendant. Kotobukiya noticed that black-and-white televisions were starting to become popular, and decided to enter into television commercials. In line with this, Ryohei Yanagihara, Ken Kaiko, and Mutsuo Sakai, an art university graduate who will become Yanagihara's junior, immediately begin a meeting. And, lo and behold, 3 minutes later, Uncle Tris was already born.

The reason for the super cheap delivery. That's because the concept was excellent. The concept, which was conceived with the premise of appearing on television, was summarized into the following three points.

(1) Make your facial expressions visible
(2) Make your (expressive) face stand out
(3) Even if it appears frequently, there should be no sarcasm

In order to convey expression, the eyes of the characters had previously been drawn with simple black dots, but by drawing ``black eyes inside round eyelids,'' he gave the eyes more nuance. In order to make her face stand out, I boldly created a ``two-and-a-half head'' proportion. Also, in order to avoid making him feel unpleasant even when commercials are frequently shown on TV (even when he is shown drinking scenes over and over again), he was made to be an ``elderly gentleman'' instead of a young man.

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

Did Uncle Tris make Yanagihara a manga artist?

Although he was a functionally created character, this middle-aged man with round eyelids and a 2-2-XNUMX/XNUMX-inch body was soon used for other characters, and became the standard specification for portraits appearing in Yanagihara manga.

If you look at Asahi Shimbun's 5-panel comic "Picaro Grandpa" (1959-), Yomiuri Shimbun's Evening Edition's "Today is a Day" (1963-), Komei Shimbun's "Ryo-chan" (1980-), etc. It's obvious at a glance. The story of the fairy tale ``The Three Police Officers'' was similar.

However, the fact that it only took 30 minutes to create this character is nothing short of miraculous. Perhaps Bacchus, the god of wine, appeared in the conference room and smiled. This is because there was probably a whiskey bottle sitting next to the three people that would be convenient for Bacchus to hide in (for filming). (Next issue below)

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

References
・“Ryohei Yanagihara’s My Life” (Kisaragi Publishing)
・"Picture Diary of a Boat Trip" (Tokuma Bunko)
・“Ryohei Yanagihara Gallery of the Sea, Ships, and Port” (Yokohama Port Museum)

References
・“Ryohei Yanagihara’s My Life” (Kisaragi Publishing)
・"Picture Diary of a Boat Trip" (Tokuma Bunko)
・“Ryohei Yanagihara Gallery of the Sea, Ships, and Port” (Yokohama Port Museum)