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uncle editor
Jun 9, 2023

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~01

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~01

uncle editor

Jun 9, 2023

I can't say what's better, it's frustrating.

I can't say what's better, it's frustrating.

The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portrait paintings

The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portrait paintings

A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship.

Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like cartoons.

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, one of the three major shipping companies in Japan, continues to use Ryohei Yanagihara's illustrations not only on the cover but also on all pages from January to December in its annual PR desk calendar. In other words, Yanagihara's ship paintings prove to be high-quality works that touch the hearts of MOL staff members who are shipping professionals.

What about the portraits on the other hand? Speaking of which, the character who appeared under the name "Uncle Tris" in his masterpiece has been around for a long time (not far from 1958) during the post-war recovery and growth period, but he still appears in commercials for Toris Whiskey (Suntory). He has co-starred with Yuriko Taka and has become a popular figure on a national level.

On the other hand, the character that Yanagihara draws on the ship is called ``Uncle Captain,'' and although his recognition is far from Uncle Triss, he has a special charm for Yanagihara fans. . Because he gives warmth to the iron structure of the ship.

A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship.

Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like cartoons.

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, one of the three major shipping companies in Japan, continues to use Ryohei Yanagihara's illustrations not only on the cover but also on all pages from January to December in its annual PR desk calendar. In other words, Yanagihara's ship paintings prove to be high-quality works that touch the hearts of MOL staff members who are shipping professionals.

What about the portraits on the other hand? Speaking of which, the character who appeared under the name "Uncle Tris" in his masterpiece has been around for a long time (not far from 1958) during the post-war recovery and growth period, but he still appears in commercials for Toris Whiskey (Suntory). He has co-starred with Yuriko Taka and has become a popular figure on a national level.

On the other hand, the character that Yanagihara draws on the ship is called ``Uncle Captain,'' and although his recognition is far from Uncle Triss, he has a special charm for Yanagihara fans. . Because he gives warmth to the iron structure of the ship.

A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship.

Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like cartoons.

Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, one of the three major shipping companies in Japan, continues to use Ryohei Yanagihara's illustrations not only on the cover but also on all pages from January to December in its annual PR desk calendar. In other words, Yanagihara's ship paintings prove to be high-quality works that touch the hearts of MOL staff members who are shipping professionals.

What about the portraits on the other hand? Speaking of which, the character who appeared under the name "Uncle Tris" in his masterpiece has been around for a long time (not far from 1958) during the post-war recovery and growth period, but he still appears in commercials for Toris Whiskey (Suntory). He has co-starred with Yuriko Taka and has become a popular figure on a national level.

On the other hand, the character that Yanagihara draws on the ship is called ``Uncle Captain,'' and although his recognition is far from Uncle Triss, he has a special charm for Yanagihara fans. . Because he gives warmth to the iron structure of the ship.

Why does it appeal to people's hearts?

Why does it appeal to people's hearts?

When you see his works where these elements are harmoniously integrated, you can't help but look at each part of the painting, and even begin to wonder about its background. As I was doing this, I suddenly found myself getting caught up in all sorts of thoughts. They say, ``I see,'' or ``Oh, by any chance.''

In other words, Ryohei Yanagihara's works are strange and never tire of looking at them. This "mysterious" part is the secret, and since I don't know why I never get tired of watching it, I want to know more about it.

What do you like about your favorite woman? It's almost like being asked that question and not being able to answer right away. However, no matter how hard I try to list the beauty of the woman I like, it's too personal and no one will benefit.

On the other hand, what is it about your favorite paintings that fascinates you? As long as the theme is Ryohei Yanagihara's works, which have many fans, it is possible to get unexpected reactions from fellow enthusiasts and collectors, and to create new ideas for people who are not familiar with his works. You can expect positive developments such as being able to show off your charm.

That's why I did a lot of research to find out the source of the appeal of his work, but the more I researched the man Ryohei Yanagihara, the more I realized that not only is he an incredible talent, but he's also an incredible ``funeral person.'' Moreover, I have come to realize that he is an extremely well-educated person.

When you see his works where these elements are harmoniously integrated, you can't help but look at each part of the painting, and even begin to wonder about its background. As I was doing this, I suddenly found myself getting caught up in all sorts of thoughts. They say, ``I see,'' or ``Oh, by any chance.''

In other words, Ryohei Yanagihara's works are strange and never tire of looking at them. This "mysterious" part is the secret, and since I don't know why I never get tired of watching it, I want to know more about it.

What do you like about your favorite woman? It's almost like being asked that question and not being able to answer right away. However, no matter how hard I try to list the beauty of the woman I like, it's too personal and no one will benefit.

On the other hand, what is it about your favorite paintings that fascinates you? As long as the theme is Ryohei Yanagihara's works, which have many fans, it is possible to get unexpected reactions from fellow enthusiasts and collectors, and to create new ideas for people who are not familiar with his works. You can expect positive developments such as being able to show off your charm.

That's why I did a lot of research to find out the source of the appeal of his work, but the more I researched the man Ryohei Yanagihara, the more I realized that not only is he an incredible talent, but he's also an incredible ``funeral person.'' Moreover, I have come to realize that he is an extremely well-educated person.

Yes, let's go listen to the story!

Yes, let's go listen to the story!

Not satisfied with just researching, he came up with the idea of ​​asking people who knew the late Ryohei Yanagihara well. These people include Ryota Yanagihara, his son, Masakatsu Shizawa, former director of Yokohama Port Museum, Junko Nakajima and Hidenori Onuki, former Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, and even those who have been researching Yokohama's art history since the end of the Edo period. These include Masayuki Okabe, a professor emeritus at Teikyo University, who had contact with Ryohei Yanagihara through various connections. Fortunately, these people kindly accepted our interview requests. I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude.

As the interviews have progressed, I would like to relate the many valuable comments I received to his works and publications that are out in the world, and delve into his talent and human charm in the form of a series of columns. Ultimately, I hope to be able to find the source of the appeal of the works he created.

I am aware that this may be a bit intimidating, but I begin this ``note: RyoheIZM'' in which I talk about Ryohei Yanagihara's works and the charm of his characters ``from an amateur's perspective.'' I would be happy if it reaches the eyes of people who know more about the work and Ryohei Yanagihara as a person. I would be even more grateful if you could give me your opinions and suggestions. Furthermore, I would be even more happy if I could get sympathy from people who didn't know Ryohei Yanagihara! (Next issue below)

Not satisfied with just researching, he came up with the idea of ​​asking people who knew the late Ryohei Yanagihara well. These people include Ryota Yanagihara, his son, Masakatsu Shizawa, former director of Yokohama Port Museum, Junko Nakajima and Hidenori Onuki, former Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, and even those who have been researching Yokohama's art history since the end of the Edo period. These include Masayuki Okabe, a professor emeritus at Teikyo University, who had contact with Ryohei Yanagihara through various connections. Fortunately, these people kindly accepted our interview requests. I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude.

As the interviews have progressed, I would like to relate the many valuable comments I received to his works and publications that are out in the world, and delve into his talent and human charm in the form of a series of columns. Ultimately, I hope to be able to find the source of the appeal of the works he created.

I am aware that this may be a bit intimidating, but I begin this ``note: RyoheIZM'' in which I talk about Ryohei Yanagihara's works and the charm of his characters ``from an amateur's perspective.'' I would be happy if it reaches the eyes of people who know more about the work and Ryohei Yanagihara as a person. I would be even more grateful if you could give me your opinions and suggestions. Furthermore, I would be even more happy if I could get sympathy from people who didn't know Ryohei Yanagihara! (Next issue below)

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

People who cooperated:

● Ryota Yanagihara (Ryota Yanagihara) Born in April 1961 in Tokyo, the eldest son of father Ryohei and mother Kaoru. When he was 4 years old he moved to Yokohama and spent his childhood in Yokohama. In 3, he joined the Bank of Japan. He retired from the Bank of Japan in 1985 and is currently working at a logistics company. He lives in Tokyo.      

● Masakatsu Shizawa In 1978, he became a curator at the Yokohama Marine Science Museum, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara, who was a director of the museum. Their friendship continued until Yanagihara's death. Since then, he has built a career at Yokohama Maritime Museum (currently Yokohama Minato Museum), and was appointed director in 2015. He retired in 2019 and is currently researching maritime history.                   

●Atsuko Nakajima Joined Osaka Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (currently Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd.) in 1976. After working in the secretary's office, she was transferred to the public relations office, where she has been in charge of site management and production of company newsletters and public relations magazines. In 2002, she established the ``Honorary Captain Yanagihara Museum'' on the site. She became the point of contact for ordering Yanagihara's works, and they continued to correspond like a correspondence for about 13 years.

●Hidenori Onuki Joined Osaka Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (currently Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd.) in 1982. After working in the liner and container ship division, where he was involved in route management and sales, he transferred to the public relations office in 2000, where he met Yanagihara during a meeting about commissioning works. After that, he deepened his friendship with Yanagihara by inviting her to the completion ceremony of a new ship and aboard a cargo ship for reporting.

●Masayuki Okabe Born in 1957 in Yokohama. Since he was a boy, he has been interested in the art, port and ship culture, and history of his hometown, Yokohama. In 1984, he worked as a curator in the preparation room of the Yokohama City Museum of Art, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara through a regional culture salon. In 1992, he became a full-time lecturer (art history) at the Department of History, Faculty of Letters, Teikyo University. Currently professor emeritus of the Faculty of Letters at Teikyo University and special director of the Gunma Museum of Modern Art.  

People who cooperated:

● Ryota Yanagihara (Ryota Yanagihara) Born in April 1961 in Tokyo, the eldest son of father Ryohei and mother Kaoru. When he was 4 years old he moved to Yokohama and spent his childhood in Yokohama. In 3, he joined the Bank of Japan. He retired from the Bank of Japan in 1985 and is currently working at a logistics company. He lives in Tokyo.      

● Masakatsu Shizawa In 1978, he became a curator at the Yokohama Marine Science Museum, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara, who was a director of the museum. Their friendship continued until Yanagihara's death. Since then, he has built a career at Yokohama Maritime Museum (currently Yokohama Minato Museum), and was appointed director in 2015. He retired in 2019 and is currently researching maritime history.                   

●Atsuko Nakajima Joined Osaka Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (currently Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd.) in 1976. After working in the secretary's office, she was transferred to the public relations office, where she has been in charge of site management and production of company newsletters and public relations magazines. In 2002, she established the ``Honorary Captain Yanagihara Museum'' on the site. She became the point of contact for ordering Yanagihara's works, and they continued to correspond like a correspondence for about 13 years.

●Hidenori Onuki Joined Osaka Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (currently Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd.) in 1982. After working in the liner and container ship division, where he was involved in route management and sales, he transferred to the public relations office in 2000, where he met Yanagihara during a meeting about commissioning works. After that, he deepened his friendship with Yanagihara by inviting her to the completion ceremony of a new ship and aboard a cargo ship for reporting.

●Masayuki Okabe Born in 1957 in Yokohama. Since he was a boy, he has been interested in the art, port and ship culture, and history of his hometown, Yokohama. In 1984, he worked as a curator in the preparation room of the Yokohama City Museum of Art, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara through a regional culture salon. In 1992, he became a full-time lecturer (art history) at the Department of History, Faculty of Letters, Teikyo University. Currently professor emeritus of the Faculty of Letters at Teikyo University and special director of the Gunma Museum of Modern Art.  

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .