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uncle editor
July 27, 2023

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~04

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~04

uncle editor

July 27, 2023

The taste of line drawing

The taste of line drawing

Simple line drawings begin to speak

Simple line drawings begin to speak

Line drawings are the origin of Ryohei Yanagihara's work. For him, sketching is a daily routine, and it begins with line drawings. He has left behind many delicious line drawings.

The painting ``Three Police Officers'' (Gakken) is one of the works where you can see such illustrations. The three main characters, the police officers, are, as usual, two-and-a-half heads and have almost the same faces except for the direction of their beards, but each has exquisite expressions and elaborate clothing, giving them a comical yet unique presence. It gives off a feeling.

Line drawings are the origin of Ryohei Yanagihara's work. For him, sketching is a daily routine, and it begins with line drawings. He has left behind many delicious line drawings.

The painting ``Three Police Officers'' (Gakken) is one of the works where you can see such illustrations. The three main characters, the police officers, are, as usual, two-and-a-half heads and have almost the same faces except for the direction of their beards, but each has exquisite expressions and elaborate clothing, giving them a comical yet unique presence. It gives off a feeling.

Leave an impression on a child's brain

Masayuki Okabe, a professor emeritus at Teikyo University, said that when he read this book as a child, he was filled with an indescribable eerie feeling. That's how much of an impact it had. “Yeah, I guess that's how I felt when I first saw it. It's how I felt when I was a child, so I don't know why I thought that way.

Well, it wasn't just a heartwarming story.''The major difference between Uncle Triss and the police officer, other than the face, is the presence or absence of a neck. In other words, Uncle Triss doesn't have a head, but the policeman does. However, it only looks like he has a neck because of the policeman's costume.

A rich expression hidden in simplicity

Leave an impression on a child's brain

One of the characteristics of Ryohei Yanagihara's portraits is that they are simple yet expressive. If you look closely, you can see the joy, anger, sadness, and happiness in each picture, such as the smug and nervous faces (of course, this is because you are looking at the pictures while reading the story). In contrast, the unchanging smile of the three assistants, the Botsford boys, expresses a strong calmness (=excellence).

In that sense, it's a story with easy-to-understand characters, and Yanagihara's ability to read those characters and subtly translate them into visuals is truly admirable.

Nowadays, we often see manga where all the characters, except for the villains, are beautiful men and women (sometimes you can't tell who they are unless you look at their hairstyles or clothes), but the characters drawn by Ryohei Yanagihara are the exact opposite. There are no sparkling beautiful men or women. And everyone is different. That's good. Although it is a fairy tale (for children), it has a hook that draws adults in as well, just like the pictures of ships.

Masayuki Okabe, a professor emeritus at Teikyo University, said that when he read this book as a child, he was filled with an indescribable eerie feeling. That's how much of an impact it had.

"Yeah, I guess that's how I felt when I first saw it. It's how I felt when I was a child, so I don't know why I thought that way. Well, it wasn't just a heartwarming story."

The major difference between Uncle Triss and the police officer, other than the face, is the presence or absence of a neck. In other words, Uncle Triss doesn't have a head, but the policeman does. However, it only looks like he has a neck because of the policeman's costume.

A rich expression hidden in simplicity

Upscale sense acquired on a cruise

One of the characteristics of Ryohei Yanagihara's portraits is that they are simple yet expressive. If you look closely, you can see the joy, anger, sadness, and happiness in each picture, such as the smug and nervous faces (of course, this is because you are looking at the pictures while reading the story).

In contrast, the unchanging smile of the three assistants, the Botsford boys, expresses a strong calmness (=excellence). In that sense, it's a story with easy-to-understand characters, and Yanagihara's ability to read those characters and subtly translate them into visuals is truly admirable.

Nowadays, we often see manga where all the characters, except for the villains, are beautiful men and women (sometimes you can't tell who they are unless you look at their hairstyles or clothes), but the characters drawn by Ryohei Yanagihara are the exact opposite. There are no sparkling beautiful men or women. And everyone is different. That's good. Although it is a fairy tale (for children), it has a hook that draws adults in as well, just like the pictures of ships.

Upscale sense acquired on a cruise

What is especially noteworthy is Yanagihara's sense of drawing clothes. This outfit is perfect for a police officer who doesn't have a lot of free time because of the peace and finds purpose in designing and updating uniforms. The Botsford boys are wearing their old uniforms, and if you compare the epaulettes, etc., there is a noticeable difference. It's also interesting to see how the three uniforms become overly decorated.

In this regard, my experience of traveling around the world by boat and interacting with Westerners from the era of 1 yen to the dollar is invaluable. In the 360s, the average Japanese walked around the deck of a ship traveling around the Seto Inland Sea wearing a stylish appapa (a simple sundress) and sandals. Ryohei Yanagihara, on the other hand, wore a tuxedo and bow tie while eating dinner and serving wine to the Westerners sitting around the same table. This is an overwhelmingly different experience. It is no wonder that the paintings created by this naturally acquired sense are of a level that is beyond the reach of ordinary people.

If there was a ship like this, I would love to ride it!

And the highlight is definitely the picture of the ship. In particular, it depicts an impossible dinosaur-shaped ship that appears at the end, but it has a proper power room and rudder, and there is no compromise in the details. This is a true demonstration of ``beauty is in the details''. I am truly amazed at Yanagihara's creativity in creating a ship that is perfectly suited to the content of the text and that seems capable of sailing properly.

This is a children's story published in America in 1938, so of course Yanagihara read the story and drew it, but if anything, I think the author probably wrote the story after looking at this picture. That's what I think. The content and pictures are a perfect match.

I hear that author William Penn DuBois's fairy tales are well-received for the way they are written in a way that makes them seem achievable, based on scientific rationality, even if they are just dreams. In other words, even though it is fantasy, there are many works that are written with knowledge to back it up, and this work is probably one of them.

Whether it's about ships or fashion, the imagination of the illustrator needs to be backed up with that much knowledge and education to visualize the imaginary vehicles and clothing created by the artist using such knowledge. It's over. However, as expected of Ryohei Yanagihara, he has created something that is subtle but makes you understand. It gives a sense of extraordinary education.

If I were the editor of this book, I'm sure I would have cried with joy when I saw this picture. However, for Yanagihara himself, I'm sure he tends to get serious when it comes to paintings of ships (I don't mean that other paintings aren't taken seriously, of course, so please don't get me wrong).

The author of this book, William Penn Dubois, was also a painter. For the first book he published, he wrote the story, but apparently also drew the cover himself. It is much more complex than Yanagihara's paintings, or rather, it is drawn with a realistic touch.

However, I feel that Yanagihara's monochrome line drawings are many times more interesting (although I apologize to the author Dubois for saying this). Am I the only one who fantasizes that I wanted to show this book to the late Dubois and see the surprised and delighted look on his face? (Next issue below)

What is especially noteworthy is Yanagihara's sense of drawing clothes. This outfit is perfect for a police officer who doesn't have a lot of free time because of the peace and finds purpose in designing and updating uniforms. The Botsford boys are wearing their old uniforms, and if you compare the epaulettes, etc., there is a noticeable difference. It's also interesting to see how the three uniforms become overly decorated. In this regard, my experience of traveling around the world by boat and interacting with Westerners from the era of 1 yen to the dollar is invaluable.

In the 1960s, the average Japanese walked around the deck of a ship traveling around the Seto Inland Sea wearing a stylish appapa (a simple sundress) and sandals. Ryohei Yanagihara, on the other hand, was eating dinner in a tuxedo and bow tie, serving wine to the Westerners sitting around the same table. This is an overwhelmingly different experience. It is no wonder that the paintings created by this naturally acquired sense are of a level that is beyond the reach of ordinary people.

If there was a ship like this, I would love to ride it!

And the highlight is definitely the picture of the ship. In particular, it depicts an impossible dinosaur-shaped ship that appears at the end, but it has a proper power room and rudder, and there is no compromise in the details. This is a true demonstration of ``beauty is in the details''. I am truly amazed at Yanagihara's creativity in creating a ship that is perfectly suited to the content of the text and that seems capable of sailing properly.

This is a children's story published in America in 1938, so of course Yanagihara read the story and drew it, but if anything, I think the author probably wrote the story after looking at this picture. That's what I think. The content and pictures are a perfect match.

I hear that author William Penn DuBois's fairy tales are well-received for the way they are written in a way that makes them seem achievable, based on scientific rationality, even if they are just dreams. In other words, even though it is fantasy, there are many works that are written with knowledge to back it up, and this work is probably one of them.

Whether it's about ships or fashion, in order to visualize the fictional vehicles and clothing created by the artist using his/her knowledge, the illustrator's imagination must be backed by that much knowledge and education, otherwise it will fall short. I end up. However, as expected of Ryohei Yanagihara, he has created something that is subtle but makes you understand. It gives a sense of extraordinary education.

If I were the editor of this book, I'm sure I would have cried with joy when I saw this picture. However, for Yanagihara himself, I'm sure he tends to get serious when it comes to paintings of ships (I don't mean that other paintings aren't taken seriously, of course, so please don't get me wrong).

The author of this book, William Penn Dubois, was also a painter. For the first book he published, he wrote the story, but apparently also drew the cover himself. It is much more complex than Yanagihara's paintings, or rather, it is drawn with a realistic touch.

However, I feel that Yanagihara's monochrome line drawings are many times more interesting (although I apologize to the author Dubois for saying this). Am I the only one who fantasizes that I wanted to show this book to the late Dubois and see the surprised and delighted look on his face? (Next issue below)

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

Ryohei Yanagihara

Born in Tokyo in 1931. In 1954, he joined Kotobukiya (now Suntory Holdings). He produced many popular advertisements one after another and won many awards, including the Dentsu Award and the Mainichi Industrial Design Award, before retiring and going independent. He loved ships and ports and moved to Yokohama. In addition to being a painter, he is a graphic designer, book designer, picture book author, animator, and writer. Passed away on August 2015, 8 at the age of 17.

uncle editor

People in Royalty Bank. After working for a publishing company, he became independent and wrote articles for magazines and the web. Fascinated by the splendor of Ryohei Yanagihara's works, he began writing this column.

*Editor's note
The expression ``Fune-Kichi'' expresses the nuance of ``an unusual ship enthusiast.'' This expression is often used by Ryohei Yanagihara in his books, mainly towards himself, but there is no sense of any discrimination or contempt in it. Therefore, in this column, I purposely use the word ``funekichi'' without replacing it with other words.   

References
・“Shoboutei Shutsu Dosei” (Fukuinkan Shoten)

Those who cooperated

●Masayuki Okabe Born in 1957 in Yokohama. Since he was a boy, he has been interested in the art, port and ship culture, and history of his hometown, Yokohama. In 1984, he worked as a curator in the preparation room of the Yokohama City Museum of Art, where he met Ryohei Yanagihara through a regional culture salon. In 1992, he became a full-time lecturer (art history) at the Department of History, Faculty of Letters, Teikyo University. Currently professor emeritus of the Faculty of Letters at Teikyo University and special director of the Gunma Museum of Modern Art. References

References
・"Three Police Officers" Author: William Penn Dubois (Gakken)
・"Picture Diary of a Boat Trip" (Tokuma Bunko)

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .

Ryohei Yanagihara principle ~RyoheIZM~

The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
The path, the ship and the port that you carve for yourself are themes that Ryohei Yanagihara has faced throughout his life, and anyone who looks at his paintings is captivated by Yanagihara's unique style, which is full of originality. I will write about his charm many times in the future, changing hands and objects, but before that, I would like to highlight another characteristic of his work: the interestingness of his portraits. .
It's frustrating not being able to say what's good about it The charm of ship paintings and the fun of portraits A painting of a ship by Ryohei Yanagihara. Sometimes it's a luxury cruise ship moored at a pier, and sometimes it's a powerful container ship being unloaded with a crane. Some of the works depict passengers waving from the deck of a passenger ship, or a captain gazing at the ship's course from the bridge of a cargo ship. Although the painting of the ship itself is far from realistic, it exudes a unique sense of detail and condensation, while the people are deformed to look like manga. .